Welcome

“The function of education is to teach one to think intensively and to think critically. Intelligence plus character – that is the goal of true education.”

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

The mission of Friday Truehart Consultants is to remedy the omission and miseducation about slavery in the United States and examine how this national story directly impacts and shapes the future.

Elaine Buck and Beverly Mills

In 2019 Elaine Buck and Beverly Mills formed Friday Truehart Consultants to bring awareness that there is more to American history than the single Anglo narrative. Because of the egregious omission of the African American narrative in our nation’s history books, Friday Truehart Consultants strives to see African American history built into K-12 curriculum throughout the State, and not consigned to one month out of the year during Black History Month.

Named after Beverly’s enslaved fourth great grandfather, Friday Truehart, the firm provides consulting services to schools, community groups and others who seek a better understanding of the American slave system. Friday Truehart Consultants is eager to work with educators who wish to partner in bringing a fuller educational awareness of African American history to their schools, and by doing so become change agents in their schools and communities.

Last but certainly not least, because of the numerous “aha!” moments Beverly and Elaine experienced while researching their book, If These Stones Could Talk: African American Presence in the Hopewell Valley, Sourland Mountain, and Surrounding Regions of New Jersey, Friday Truehart Consultants will also offer genealogy services to people interested in uncovering traces of their history and perhaps answer questions that have long gone unanswered.

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I gave my brother a copy of “If These Stones Could Talk” as an early Christmas present. It was the first book he had read in a long time, and he could not put it down! We spent the entire holiday talking about family history.

Pat Payne, Retired Library (and Truehart relative)

For those of us who are your contemporaries and were once neighbors, I have to believe that my understanding of your book, and its visceral impact, are heightened by my sense of familiarity. For example, I was a student of Mr. Renwick in the early 1960s. He commanded our respect and he taught us so much. We must bring back capable teaching of social studies and it must include all of our histories. Thank you from my heart for sharing your stories.

Whitney Wetherill